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US tech firm Qarik creates 50 research hub jobs in Northern Ireland

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Co-founder: Armagh man Gavan Corr studied at Queen’s and Ulster University

Co-founder: Armagh man Gavan Corr studied at Queen’s and Ulster University

Co-founder: Armagh man Gavan Corr studied at Queen’s and Ulster University

A New York technology firm founded by a Co Armagh man is setting up in Northern Ireland and bringing 50 new jobs.

Qarik has already hired 37 people for its operation here.

When filled, the 50 jobs in areas such as software engineering and data science will contribute around £2.2m in salaries to the economy every year - an average of £44,000.

The business, co-founded last year by Gavan Corr, specialises in cloud-based data management and analysis software development for US corporations. Its operation here is a research and delivery hub aiding colleagues in America develop solutions for clients' data analytical processes.

Economy Minister Diane Dodds said she was pleased the company had decided to set up here after meeting Mr Corr and co-founder Joe Schenk in New York in March.

She added: "As well as roles at a senior level, the project also includes 10 positions specifically aimed at new graduates.

"The combination of opportunities for those starting out in their career and roles for those with experience brings a lot of benefit to our growing software development sector, as well as contributing nearly £2.2m in annual salaries to the economy."

Mr Corr said that after studying at Queen's and Ulster University, he knew that Northern Ireland was the right place for his research team. He said the new roles were being filled much faster than anticipated. "This not only gives us confidence in our decision but optimism for future growth here," he added.

Mr Schenk said the work would enable financial clients to manage large volumes of data and comply with regulations.

Invest NI has offered £325,000 towards the new roles. Chief executive Kevin Holland said the speed at which the jobs had been filled reflected the skills base available locally to potential employers.

Belfast Telegraph