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Quality of life in United Kingdom back to 2007 levels

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Crowds gather to watch the 2015 Pennywell Bacon Stakes Steeplechase special General Election pig race, featuring Ed Swiliband for the Labour Party, Pork Clegg for the Liberal Democrats, Nigel Forage for Ukip, David Hameron for the Conservative Party and Pork Scratchings representing all other political parties. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday April, 14, 2015. Photo credit should read: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

Crowds gather to watch the 2015 Pennywell Bacon Stakes Steeplechase special General Election pig race, featuring Ed Swiliband for the Labour Party, Pork Clegg for the Liberal Democrats, Nigel Forage for Ukip, David Hameron for the Conservative Party and Pork Scratchings representing all other political parties. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday April, 14, 2015. Photo credit should read: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

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Crowds gather to watch the 2015 Pennywell Bacon Stakes Steeplechase special General Election pig race, featuring Ed Swiliband for the Labour Party, Pork Clegg for the Liberal Democrats, Nigel Forage for Ukip, David Hameron for the Conservative Party and Pork Scratchings representing all other political parties. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday April, 14, 2015. Photo credit should read: Ben Birchall/PA Wire

People in the UK are no more satisfied with their lives than they were before the financial crash, new figures show. When asked to rate their quality of life out of 10, UK residents give an average score of 6.8 - the same as in 2007.

The figure suggests Britons are more satisfied with their lives than people in Italy (6.0) and Portugal (5.1), but not as content as residents of Norway (7.4) or Australia (7.3).

Among all the 34 members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Greece has the lowest life satisfaction score (4.8) while Denmark, Iceland and Switzerland have the highest (7.4).

The UK's score is slightly above the OECD average of 6.6 points.

The figures are among a collection of information on wellbeing from the Office for National Statistics, which compares a range of recently-published data for the UK with other countries around the world.

The proportion of people saying they are completely, very or fairly happy with their life stands at 87.2%.

 

Belfast Telegraph