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Coronavirus: Lisburn security firm Mercury creates camera to detect fever from a distance

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Mercury Security and Facilities Management said the Mercury TC-1 Camera produces thermal images to enable the speedy detection of a high body temperature which may indicate the presence of a fever - one of the first vital symptoms displayed by carriers of coronavirus.

Mercury Security and Facilities Management said the Mercury TC-1 Camera produces thermal images to enable the speedy detection of a high body temperature which may indicate the presence of a fever - one of the first vital symptoms displayed by carriers of coronavirus.

Mercury Security and Facilities Management said the Mercury TC-1 Camera produces thermal images to enable the speedy detection of a high body temperature which may indicate the presence of a fever - one of the first vital symptoms displayed by carriers of coronavirus.

A Lisburn security firm says it has invested in camera technology that can detect fever symptoms in one second and from up to two metres away.

Mercury Security and Facilities Management (MSFM) said the Mercury TC-1 Camera produces thermal images to enable the speedy detection of a high body temperature which may indicate the presence of a fever - one of the first vital symptoms displayed by carriers of the coronavirus.

It also allows large numbers of people to be screened at one time. Subjects can walk through the field of view together and the camera will scan them without impeding their passage in any way.

Once the camera is installed, users can set the desired temperature level which, if exceeded, will trigger an audio and/or visual alert to notify the operator.

Frank Cullen, chief executive at MSFM, said: "From the outset of this terrible pandemic, we've been researching the latest global technology to see if we could find something that would be helpful to organisations. The result of our research is the Mercury TC-1, a cost-effective thermal camera that we believe could prove a vital tool in detecting high temperatures amongst staff, customers and visitors to any building with a significant footfall.

"The country might be in lockdown at the moment but we still have lots of brave health workers in the front line, with the likes of supermarkets and essential stores open to the public to supply us with the essential goods and medication we need."

Belfast Telegraph