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New Ulster Bank £20 bank note has ‘skeleton and bat’ security features

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The new Ulster Bank notes

The new Ulster Bank notes

The new Ulster Bank notes

Most people in Northern Ireland are still using bank notes and two-third think they’ll still have them in their wallets in five years’ time, according to Ulster Bank.

The bank carried out research into public attitudes to bank notes as it launched its new £20 polymer note - a material said to last more than twice as long as paper notes.

The new £20 features street entertainers as well as tiles, brickwork and patterns inspired by traditional red-brick terraced homes.

Other elements of the note reflect features of famous public buildings.

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The new Ulster Bank notes

The new Ulster Bank notes

The new Ulster Bank notes

And there is a nod to Londonderry’s famous Hallowe’en celebrations - in abeyance for this year - as security features visible under UV light incorporate skeletons and Leisler’s bat, the largest type of bat in Ireland

While nearly 90% of people said they still used notes, many had experienced problems having Northern Ireland notes accepted in Great Britain.

However, 61% of people surveyed by research firm Cognisense did acknowledge that their use of notes had fallen during the Covid-19 pandemic.

But only 13% said they now use digital exclusively as a means to pay for goods, with 42% using a combination of cash and digital.

And 67% of those surveyed also said they valued the fact that Northern Ireland banks were still producing their own notes.

Terry Robb, Ulster Bank’s head of personal banking in NI, said: “The new polymer notes last two-and-a-half-times longer than traditional cotton notes, making them more sustainable and environmentally friendly.

“Their advanced security features also make it easier for customers to protect themselves from being a victim of fraud. And encouragingly, our research shows that the public do see polymer as more secure than the older notes.”

Belfast Telegraph