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Scottish service secures Northern Ireland hydrogen bus role

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From left, Nick Stapley, Lukasz Adamczewski , Bill Ireland, Oliver Ireland, Stuart Whitson, David Bell, Guilherme Gaxaria, Hazel Macphail, Colette Irons, Paul Robinson and Keith Taylor

From left, Nick Stapley, Lukasz Adamczewski , Bill Ireland, Oliver Ireland, Stuart Whitson, David Bell, Guilherme Gaxaria, Hazel Macphail, Colette Irons, Paul Robinson and Keith Taylor

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From left, Nick Stapley, Lukasz Adamczewski , Bill Ireland, Oliver Ireland, Stuart Whitson, David Bell, Guilherme Gaxaria, Hazel Macphail, Colette Irons, Paul Robinson and Keith Taylor

Scottish firm Logan Energy has been selected to transport hydrogen gas to Belfast's Translink bus depot to power a new fleet of buses.

The company will become part of an £8m green hydrogen project here as it supplies hydrogen tube trailers to carry compressed hydrogen from a wind farm in Co Antrim owned by Energia Group.

The hydrogen will power a fleet of Translink double decker fuel-cell buses, using a refuelling station which will also be supplied and maintained by Logan Energy.

It was selected by Irish gas and electricity supplier Energia, which is a lead partner organisation in the £7.9m EU-funded 'GenCOMM' project, aimed at developing hydrogen-based energy and commercial models to improve sustainability.

Logan Energy said it had proposed "the most innovative and cost-effective tube trailer solution".

Bill Ireland, chief executive of Logan Energy, said: "This contract is significant for us because it shows that our extensive technical track record of hydrogen systems, and proven ability to deliver, is valued by key players such as Energia, but it also demonstrates a viable renewable hydrogen supply and demand scenario that we can replicate in towns and cities throughout the UK, Europe and further afield."

The contract follows on from news that Jo Bamford, the owner of manufacturer Wrightbus, is pushing for a Government subsidy to fund the building of more than 3,000 hydrogen-fuelled buses in Ballymena, which he has said could create 1,500 more jobs in the town.

He told the Belfast Telegraph last month: "We'd like to get an agreement on it as quickly as possible then build the infrastructure and roll it out over a number of years.

"My plan is to decarbonise all buses and all trains, though to fill them up with hydrogen, you need to put money down to build infrastructure."

Belfast Telegraph