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Ulster stars' South African banger a real taste of home

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Ulster Rugby players Louis Ludik and Schalk Van Der Merwe tasting the new Hellbent boerewors with Dr Amy Burns and Bruno Etienne of Ulster Business School

Ulster Rugby players Louis Ludik and Schalk Van Der Merwe tasting the new Hellbent boerewors with Dr Amy Burns and Bruno Etienne of Ulster Business School

Ulster Rugby players Louis Ludik and Schalk Van Der Merwe tasting the new Hellbent boerewors with Dr Amy Burns and Bruno Etienne of Ulster Business School

Two Ulster Rugby players have put their time out of the team to good use by helping to bring a little known South African sausage to Northern Ireland.

Louis Ludik and Schalk Van Der Merwe have partnered with Ulster University Business School in Coleraine to produce the first 'boerewors' sausage.

The research with the business school was funded with an innovation voucher from Invest NI.

The duo were perfectly placed to offer expertise in what is a favourite food from their native country.

The name 'boerewors' is derived from the Afrikaans/Dutch words 'boer', meaning farmer, and 'wors' meaning sausage.

And for health-conscious sports stars such as Louis and Schalk, they're a lot more palatable than your average Ulster fry banger.

Often containing 90% meat, and never more than 30% fat, the spiral-shaped sausage is completely additive and gluten-free.

Schalk, who is yet to play a competitive game for the senior side this season, and Louis, who is recovering from a torn hamstring, have been working for five months to find the perfect blend of South African spices and locally produced beef to create their version of the boerewors that they've christened 'Hellbent'.

The duo are now working with Carnbrooke Meats in Dromara to get their sausages on to plates, firstly targeting the catering trade.

Long-term, they are hoping to eventually branch out to cocktail sausages, hotdogs, burgers and meatballs.

Belfast Telegraph