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Shipping giant Doyle Shipping Group to hire 250 people before Brexit

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Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), one of the largest independent shipping and warehousing companies in Ireland, is to hire more than 250 staff as the Brexit transition period end nears. (PA)

Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), one of the largest independent shipping and warehousing companies in Ireland, is to hire more than 250 staff as the Brexit transition period end nears. (PA)

Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), one of the largest independent shipping and warehousing companies in Ireland, is to hire more than 250 staff as the Brexit transition period end nears. (PA)

Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), one of the largest independent shipping and warehousing companies in Ireland, is to hire more than 250 staff as the Brexit transition period end nears.

The company, which has offices and warehouses in many major Irish ports as well as a food storage facility in Belfast, advertised for traffic management operatives and warehouse operatives.

Both adverts state that the positions have a start date of January 1, 2021, the day after the transition period ends.

DSG is hiring over 100 traffic management operatives at Dublin Port. The operatives will work as part of a team in ensuring vehicles are received and checked and that motorists are directed to parking areas or spaces. It is also set to hire over 150 warehouse operatives at Dublin Port.

The staff will work as part of a team that loads and unloads vehicles.

DSG owns and operates over a million square feet of warehousing. It has agri-feed, food-grade and general storage facilities in places including Dublin, Belfast and Cork.

The jobs from DSG have emerged as concerns mount over the pressure Brexit will put on UK and Irish ports.

Last week, Bloomberg reported that more UK companies are trying to recruit extra logistics workers to ensure ports can cope with increased demand for unloading and storing supplies.

Businesses in Northern Ireland have been warned against taking a "wait and see" approach to Brexit as one firm said it had begun stockpiling steel to guard against supply issues at the end of the transition period.

There are now 25 days to go until the end of the transition period as negotiations between the EU and UK reach the 11th hour.

KME Steelworks in Lisburn said it had begun building up its stock of steel to prepare.

But Stephen Kelly, the chief executive of Manufacturing NI, said stockpiling was not as widespread as it had been a year ago.

A survey from the Northern Ireland Business Brexit Working Group (NIBBWG) also warned that less than one in five Northern Irish businesses are prepared for the end of the transition period, with a lack of information cited as their biggest concern.

And Mr Kelly said people were wrong to regarding January 1 as another false deadline after previous delays.

"A lot of people have been taken to the top of the hill and let down again with this Brexit issue and are now waiting to see what will happen and respond as best they can - which is enormously dangerous."

Belfast Telegraph


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