Belfast Telegraph

Apple Worldwide Developers' Conference (WWDC) 2014: New OS Yosemite but no smartwatch or iPhone

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference event in San Francisco, Monday, June 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference event in San Francisco, Monday, June 2, 2014. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks about the new OS X Yosemite during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks about the new OS X Yosemite during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple CEO Tim Cook arrives to speak during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple CEO Tim Cook arrives to speak during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: People wait to get in to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: People wait to get in to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: People wait to get in to the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California.

Apple has unveiled its latest operating system along with a number of other software tweaks during its Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

The event - headed by CEO Tim Cook - focuses on giving developers new bits of software to work with.

On Monday this year's OS X update was revealed - named Yosemite.

It was unveiled by Apple’s software engineering chief, Craig Federighi.

The new version features an overall flatter look and is similar to the iOS which currently runs on Apple's iPhones and iPads.

Among the other developments is iCloud Drive - expanding the system to compete directly with Dropbox.

Of course, the launch of a new piece of hardware is what the tech world wants most from Apple.

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But unfortunately they are likely to have to wait until September for additional aluminium encased tech.

Later this year we're expecting to see two new iPhones with screen sizes of 4.7-inches and 5.5-inches.

An updated Apple TV could be possible, although some analysts have argued that there just isn’t enough profit to be had in the industry, and if Apple does make anything for the living room it’s likely to be a cheap, Chromecast-style dongle.

If there’s a key word for Apple's latest developer conference, it’s continuity. Apple exec Craig Federighi and CEO Tim Cook both mentioned it when running through the big innovations. First, a Mac and iPhone or iPad can talk to each other like never before.

AirDrop, Apple's home brewed system for sending files wirelessly and without a wi-fi network between Macs or between iOS devices will now do it between the two different platforms.

And if you’re writing an email on your iPad and it turns out to be more detailed than you’d imagined, you can put down the tablet and switch seamlessly to the Mac to type on a more conducive piece of kit (aka a keyboard). We’ll have to see how this plays out in use but the idea is tremendous.

Apple also did a lot of catching up. For instance typing on an iPhone, though good, was no match for the likes of Swiftkey, the impressive UK software company that has made text entry a doddle by predicting words before you type a single letter. The iPhone now has this – and it promises to be superbly implemented, suggesting different vocabulary depending on who you’re talking to. It knows you use different words when talking to your boss than to your lover. Well, let’s hope you do, anyway.

Apple offered stuff similar to Dropbox with its iCloud Drive which will let you store lots of photos in the cloud for a low-ish monthly fee. And even Snapchat has been honoured by imitation: you can add speech and video messages in what was previously a text message app and these will be default self-destruct.

As ever with Apple, it’s not having the idea first that counts, but implementing it simply and seamlessly as well as making thinks look good in the process  – there was much talk of screens that refreshed so smoothly they offered “buttery scrolling”. Is it hyperbole? Well, yes, but we still like the end product.

And at last, at last, Apple offered third-party support for keyboards. This may not sound much but Apple has always controlled the keyboard utterly. Now other companies can create better ways to type. Since the new swipeable keyboard on Windows Phone is sensational, having something similar on Apple is great news.

Opening up access to home automation apps and health apps is also a big deal because of Apple’s strong security concerns. If you have the right home automation hardware, then just speaking the words “Night, night, house” into your phone can lock the door, turn off the lights and more. Cool, huh?

WWDC doesn’t announce the next iPhone and iPad hardware but the software reveals the future: Apple is describing the blank canvas on which the apps will work and the next generation of hardware will exploit.

This year’s detailed announcements on features like a new programming language may not mean a great deal to most of us, but – judging by the whoops coming from the rows behind me – will dramatically change what the iPhone and iPad can do when the hardware arrives. Since much of the joy of Apple gadgetry is driven by the ingenuity of app developers, this is potentially the most exciting development in Apple software for years.

Source: Independent

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