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AstraZeneca in £309m deal with Japan's Takeda to develop Parkinson's treatment

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AstraZeneca's deal with Takeda will see both firms shoulder the commercial and development costs of the project, with any revenues being shared equally

AstraZeneca's deal with Takeda will see both firms shoulder the commercial and development costs of the project, with any revenues being shared equally

AstraZeneca's deal with Takeda will see both firms shoulder the commercial and development costs of the project, with any revenues being shared equally

AstraZeneca has struck a 400 million US dollar (£309 million) deal with Takeda Pharmaceutical to create a treatment for Parkinson's disease.

The FTSE 100 firm has joined forces with the Japanese drugs giant to bring the Medi1341 antibody to market, with Phase 1 clinical trials set for later this year.

The move comes after AstraZeneca saw its share price plunge more than 15% in July when a lung cancer drug failed the first round of the "Mystic trial" .

Mene Pangalos, AstraZeneca's executive vice president, said: "Today there are no medicines that can slow or halt the degenerative progress of Parkinson's disease so this remains a large area of unmet medical need.

"Takeda has an excellent track record in neuroscience research and we are excited to be working together.

"By combining our scientific expertise and sharing the risks and cost of development, we hope to accelerate the advancement of Medi1341 as a promising new approach to support the treatment of people with Parkinson's disease around the world."

The deal will see both firms shoulder the commercial and development costs of the project, with any revenues being shared equally.

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AstraZeneca will spearhead the Phase 1 development of Medi134, while Takeda will take charge of "future clinical development activities".

Emiliangelo Ratti, Takeda's senior vice president, said: "Despite modest advancements in maintenance therapies, Parkinson's disease continues to represent a devastating diagnosis and a burdensome challenge for therapeutic discovery.

"Our collaboration with AstraZeneca is a sophisticated one that will enable us to efficiently advance a validated target in a new modality, with the aim of improving the lives of patients."

AstraZeneca saw half-year sales fall 11% to 10.5 billion US dollars (£7.9 billion) in July after the loss of patents on profitable drugs in the US.


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