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Epic war movie 1917 is big winner at Baftas

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Sir Sam Mendes (Ian West/PA)

Sir Sam Mendes (Ian West/PA)

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The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge

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Charlize Theron

Charlize Theron

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Saoirse Ronan

Saoirse Ronan

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Scarlett Johansson

Scarlett Johansson

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Charlize Theron

Charlize Theron

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Scarlett Johansson

Scarlett Johansson

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Gillian Anderson

Gillian Anderson

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Renee Zellweger

Renee Zellweger

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Sir Sam Mendes (Ian West/PA)

Sir Sam Mendes's war film 1917 enjoyed a night of success at the Baftas as it collected the best film and outstanding British film prizes, and a slew of others.

There was recognition for the film's cinematographer Roger Deakins, as well as for its sound and production design.

Sir Sam - also named best director - said: "Thank you for giving us a really wonderful night. Thank you to all the people who have gone to see this in the cinemas, it's still on."

Star George MacKay added: "We would like to share this with every single member of the crew and the team who gave their time. The whole process in the film itself show the goodness that will come in going for something that is bigger than yourself."

The leading actress Bafta was presented to Renee Zellweger for Judy, beating Scarlett Johansson, Charlize Theron and Irish actresses Saoirse Ronan and Jessie Buckley.

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Renee Zellweger

Renee Zellweger

Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images

Renee Zellweger

Joaquin Phoenix won the leading actor prize for Joker. He won over fellow nominees Leonardo DiCaprio, Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce and Taron Egerton.

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Joaquin Phoenix spoke out about the lack of diversity (Matt Crossick/PA)

Joaquin Phoenix spoke out about the lack of diversity (Matt Crossick/PA)

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Joaquin Phoenix spoke out about the lack of diversity (Matt Crossick/PA)

Phoenix took aim at "systemic racism" and "oppression" within the industry in his acceptance speech.

The best supporting actress prize was presented to Laura Dern for Marriage Story. Her mother Diane Ladd won the award in 1975 for her role in Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, directed by Martin Scorsese.

Credit: Bafta. Sir Sam Mendes’s deeply personal film, based on a story told to him by his grandfather, won seven of the nine prizes for which it was nominated, including best film, outstanding British film, best director and best cinematography. The film has topped the box office since its arrival in cinemas and was made to look as though it was filmed in one continuous shot.

The supporting actor prize went to Brad Pitt for Once Upon A Time... In Hollywood. He couldn't attend so the prize was collected by his co-star Margot Robbie, who said Pitt was absent due to "family obligations".

Reading his speech, she said: "Hey Britain, heard you just became single, welcome to the club. Wishing you the best with the divorce settlement."

Al Pacino (79), nominated in the same category for The Irishman, was helped to his feet after falling on the red carpet earlier.

Andy Serkis accepted the outstanding British contribution to cinema award from his Lord Of The Rings co-star Sir Ian McKellen.

Belfast Telegraph