Belfast Telegraph

Farrell: I'm bored of revenge films

Colin Farrell has admitted he is "bored" by many of the revenge movie scripts he reads these days.

The Irish actor - once the go-to guy for action movies - revealed he is now seeking more character-driven projects.

"There are choices made inside you before you even get to verbalise and physicalise them in the world," said the actor, when asked whether his change of heart has been a conscious decision.

"There have been times over the years when I've wondered, 'Why do I do so many things with guns?', but I didn't draw a line and go, 'No more guns'."

But Colin, 37, confessed that in the last few months he's received numerous scripts for revenge tales that have made him think, "I couldn't be any more bored reading this."

"I think I've just flogged it to death," he added.

The star explained that he doesn't leave home for three or four months to go and work on something because the pay cheque's good.

"That's great, but you have to believe you're going to make something that at least is going to entertain people for a couple of hours," he explained. "The worst that can happen is that an audience is left apathetic. I've done a couple of things where audiences are bored, and there's a good chance I will again if I work for another 40 years."

Colin's new film, A New York Winter's Tale, is a romance that spans a hundred years. Set in a mythic New York City, he plays an Irish immigrant and thief who falls for a dying woman (Jessica Brown Findlay). Desperately trying to save her, he finds himself at the mercy of his one-time mentor, the demonic Pearly Soames (Russell Crowe), in an age-old battle between good and evil.

He said: "The film would be a departure for anyone. In many ways, it's a quintessentially pure story about the forces of light versus the forces of dark, playing out among the lives of the characters. It's unlike anything I've ever done, and probably unlike anything I'll ever do."

:: A New York Winter's Tale is in cinemas now.

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