Belfast Telegraph

Vicky McClure reunites with members of Dementia Choir for fundraiser

She joined them for a Memory Walk in Nottingham.

Line of Duty star Vicky McClure (right) on stage at the Alzheimer’s Society’s Nottingham Memory Walk alongside members of the BBC’s Our Dementia Choir (Jacob King/PA)
Line of Duty star Vicky McClure (right) on stage at the Alzheimer’s Society’s Nottingham Memory Walk alongside members of the BBC’s Our Dementia Choir (Jacob King/PA)

By Laura Harding, PA Senior Entertainment Correspondent

Vicky McClure has reunited with members of the Dementia Choir for a fundraising walk for Alzheimer’s Society.

The Line Of Duty star walked and sang alongside the choir at the Memory Walk in Nottingham to raise money to help find a cure, improve care and support for people affected by dementia.

She previously filmed a documentary about the connection between the condition and music.

Our Dementia Choir with Vicky McClure brought together people suffering from some form of dementia to see if music can help them, as they trained to perform as a choir in front of an audience of 1,000 people.

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Vicky McClure at the star of the memory walk (Jacob King/PA)

She reunited with members of the choir for her ninth successive Memory Walk, and was also joined by members of her family, who experienced dementia first-hand through caring for McClure’s grandmother (Nona) Iris, who died in 2015.

Memory Walks are Alzheimer’s Society flagship fundraising campaign across England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Some 38 walks will take place throughout September and October, in addition to other walks and events organised by volunteers.

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With members of the choir (Jacob King/PA)

McClure has previously spoken about the need for funding of dementia research, saying: “The Government doesn’t put enough funding into research. I am passionate about looking into that.

“I want to know what’s being done on that side of things.

“The funding is the hardest part, to have the choir running all the time, they’re not cheap.

“It’s free to sing, but to have that routine and providing tea and coffee and somewhere to do it, it costs money.

“It can be cheap and manageable, but it’s not free.

“(We) need the backing of councils and the Government.”

PA

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