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Prestigious award for Branagh at film festival

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Sir Kenneth Branagh with his Lifetime Achievement award during the Savannah Film Festival in Georgia at the weekend. Credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SCAD

Sir Kenneth Branagh with his Lifetime Achievement award during the Savannah Film Festival in Georgia at the weekend. Credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SCAD

Getty Images for SCAD

Sir Kenneth Branagh with his Lifetime Achievement award during the Savannah Film Festival in Georgia at the weekend. Credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SCAD

Sir Kenneth Branagh received the Lifetime Achievement in Acting and Directing at the 24th SCAD Savannah Film Festival as he was promoting his new film ‘Belfast’.

His Oscar-tipped upcoming film is a cinematic tribute to his native city and has been labelled as a “masterpiece” by critics.

Twenty-three years since his last appearance at Georgia’s SCAD Savannah Film Festival following the release of ‘The Gingerbread Man’, Branagh was back in the city and spoke of his work with students at a SCAD masterclass.

After receiving the festival’s lifetime achievement award on Saturday, Branagh said: “I can’t think about it too carefully because I’ll think, ‘Oh, my life is over… it’s all done’.

“I’d like to think it’s an encouragement to do another lifetime’s worth of work.”

Belfast, which stars Holywood actor Jamie Dornan and will be released in February, was the big screening at this year’s SCAD Film Festival.

The black-and-white period film follows a working-class family and their young son growing up in the city as the Troubles begin to break out.

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Branagh previously said it was the silence of lockdown last year that spurred him to write a story.

Speaking at the BFI London Film Festival earlier this month, he said: “I think lockdown triggered differences in lots of people. It certainly made us very introspective.

“I started being sort of possessed by it as I walked the dog and heard the silence. The planes weren’t flying and the cars weren’t driving, and in the sound of Belfast I’ve been hearing for about 50 years... as a famous composer once said when asked about how he wrote the music, he said, ‘I listened and I wrote down what I heard’, so that’s what I tried to do.”


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