Belfast Telegraph

Derry jazz festival expected to pull in more than 70,000

 

Sicilian swing band Jumpin’Up will play the City of Derry Jazz Festival
Sicilian swing band Jumpin’Up will play the City of Derry Jazz Festival
Donna Deeney

By Donna Deeney

More than 70,000 people are expected in Londonderry over the next four days for a jazz festival featuring hundreds of musicians from around the globe.

Now in its 18th year, the City of Derry Jazz Festival has become one of the most prestigious jazz events in the UK.

Marc Almond of Soft Cell fame is the headline act at the Millennium Forum tonight.

A plethora of bands will also be taking to the stage in pubs, clubs, cafes and even restaurants across the city.

Among them will be Ricky Cool and the In Crowd, Ruth James, The Roaring Forties, The Ska Beat and King Rat, who are all playing tonight. Tomorrow's acts include the Red Stripe Band, Gay McIntyre, Jumpin'Up and John and Fiona Trotter.

The party continues on Sunday and Monday with acts such as the Anchormen Jazz Orchestra, the John Quigley Band and Mirenda Rosenberg.

Wrapping up this year's festival will be the Motown Sensations, DJ Julien Jazz and the Convicts.

The festival is one of the key events in Derry and Strabane council's calender and boosts the local economy significantly.

Mayor John Boyle is looking forward to crowds soaking up the upbeat atmosphere that the event creates.

He said: "The jazz and big band festival is one of the highlights of our year and is hugely successful with a wide range of people.

"This year our young people are more involved than ever before through the Youth 19 programme, which is fantastic to see as it brings music to a whole new generation and showcases the incredible talent of the young people in the city and district.

"It is also an opportunity for our business community to demonstrate to a wider audience the high standards that they deliver day after day, making our area such a fantastic place to visit time after time."

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