| 7°C Belfast

Stormzy recalls tough upbringing in south London

The grime star said he was a ‘hood rat’ growing up.

Close

Stormzy has recalled his tough upbringing in south London and said he was a ‘hood rat’ (Isabel Infantes/PA)

Stormzy has recalled his tough upbringing in south London and said he was a ‘hood rat’ (Isabel Infantes/PA)

Stormzy has recalled his tough upbringing in south London and said he was a ‘hood rat’ (Isabel Infantes/PA)

Stormzy has recalled his tough upbringing in south London and said he was a “hood rat” growing up.

The grime star – currently number one in both the singles and albums charts – said trouble was “normal” and “part of man’s lifestyle” during his childhood in Croydon.

He also said fighting and robberies were “bog standard”.

Close

Stormzy has looked back on his childhood in south London and said trouble was ‘bog standard’ (PA/Ian West)

Stormzy has looked back on his childhood in south London and said trouble was ‘bog standard’ (PA/Ian West)

PA Wire/PA Images

Stormzy has looked back on his childhood in south London and said trouble was ‘bog standard’ (PA/Ian West)

Speaking to US radio presenter Charlamagne Tha God, Stormzy said: “No-one batted an eyelid. A robbery, a stabbing, a fight in the middle of the road, jumping in the cab and bumping the cab driver, ordering pizza and f**king robbing the pizzaman and taking his ‘ped (moped).

“That is so bog standard.”

Stormzy added: “I just remember being a hood rat.”

However, he also said he and his friends were “reckless and stupid”.

The 26-year-old is currently sitting on top of the UK album charts thanks to his second effort Heavy Is The Head while Own It, his song with Ed Sheeran and Burna Boy, is the country’s number one single.

Despite Heavy Is The Head’s success, Stormzy, who last year became the first black solo British headliner at Glastonbury, said it has not “crowned” him.

“I can’t give a chart position that much power over who I am,” he said.

But he did describe number ones as a “universal language” that would bring him greater recognition beyond the UK.

“In terms of the crown, I don’t think it solidified it,” he added. “I’d like to think it’s deeper. The crown I wear and burdens I carry, I like to think it’s deeper than that, (than) any sort of number or any sort of stats.”

In a lengthy interview, Stormzy also discussed his wider place in British culture, describing himself as a “figurehead” and “ambassador” for black culture.

PA