| 8.3°C Belfast

Irish Love Island presenter Laura Whitmore denies trying to 'recruit' for British Army

Close

Laura Whitmore

Laura Whitmore

PA

Laura Whitmore

Laura Whitmore has denied she was trying to "recruit people to the Army" after her appearance on a an Army podcast prompted a backlash.

The Irish Love Island presenter, who was a close friend of the late Caroline Flack, was hit with criticism yesterday after she posted an Instagram ad to promote an episode of The Locker, which is made in collaboration with Army Jobs.

The 35-year-old posted a picture of herself giving a thumbs up and wearing a camouflage top, revealing that she would be speaking to Ella, a soldier about "all things confidence" and "body positivity" and "being female in a male-dominated industry".

The post was accompanied by the hastags: #army confidence, #TheLocker #armyjobs #ad.

The post was later followed up by Whitemore's own tribute to the late John Hume, whose funeral was held yesterday, prompting writer Lisa Hughes to criticise the Dubliner for the juxtaposition of the posts.

After the topic started to trend on social media, Whitmore defended in a series of tweets her Hume tribute, and her podcast, stressing it was a "really important conversation for women".

The matter prompted a mixed reaction from her followers, with some defending her decision to team up with the Army for the podcast. One follower said: "Don't be ashamed. @Britisharmy is a great job for young men and women."

She later removed the #armyjobs hashtag, and subsequently posted a short statement on Twitter in response to the criticism.

"I was asked to be a guest on a podcast talking about body issues and being a female in a male-dominated industry. As I have done in the past.

"The other guest was a young female soldier.

"If this looked like me trying to recruit to the army, that is not the case at all."

She added: "I know to those who actually listen to the podcast they'll understand, but in case there's any confusion I wanted to clear it up."

Belfast Telegraph