| 13.6°C Belfast

National Gallery acquires three ‘outstanding’ 18th century portraits

The works are from the late collector and merchant banker George Pinto’s estate.

Close

Jean-Etienne Liotard’s The Lavergne Family Breakfast is one of the portraits accepted (National Gallery/PA)

Jean-Etienne Liotard’s The Lavergne Family Breakfast is one of the portraits accepted (National Gallery/PA)

Jean-Etienne Liotard’s The Lavergne Family Breakfast is one of the portraits accepted (National Gallery/PA)

The National Gallery has snapped up three 18th century portraits – although closed doors means they cannot yet be viewed in person.

The works are from the late collector and merchant banker George Pinto’s estate, under the Acceptance in Lieu scheme.

The scheme allows people to offset inheritance tax by offering works and collections to the nation, in this case £10,030,880 of tax.

Close

Sir Thomas Lawrence’s Portrait of the Hon Peniston Lamb (around 1790) (Christie’s, London, 2019)

Sir Thomas Lawrence’s Portrait of the Hon Peniston Lamb (around 1790) (Christie’s, London, 2019)

Sir Thomas Lawrence’s Portrait of the Hon Peniston Lamb (around 1790) (Christie’s, London, 2019)

Pinto died in a car accident aged 89, in 2018.

Jean-Etienne Liotard’s The Lavergne Family Breakfast (1754) is an early morning scene showing a woman and her daughter, who has paper curlers in her hair.

Thomas Gainsborough’s Portrait Of Margaret Gainsborough Holding A Theorbo (a plucked string instrument) and Sir Thomas Lawrence’s Portrait of the Hon Peniston Lamb (c1790) have also been acquired.

Close

Thomas Gainsborough’s Portrait Of Margaret Gainsborough Holding A Theorbo (National Portrait Gallery, London)

Thomas Gainsborough’s Portrait Of Margaret Gainsborough Holding A Theorbo (National Portrait Gallery, London)

Thomas Gainsborough’s Portrait Of Margaret Gainsborough Holding A Theorbo (National Portrait Gallery, London)

They will each have a dedicated artwork page on the National Gallery’s website from Wednesday.

Culture minister Caroline Dinenage said: “The Acceptance in Lieu scheme shares the generous gifts of art lovers with the British public.

“Thanks to the scheme, these three outstanding works will join the National Gallery’s collection for future generations to enjoy.

“I am pleased that the works will be online from today, giving people the opportunity to enjoy them from their own homes.”

PA