Belfast Telegraph

'Psycho ceilidh' rockers at best on stage

The Logues: Strule Arts Centre, Omagh Wednesday, 8pm

By Damien Murray

The Castlederg folk-rock outfit (also at Strabane’s Alley Theatre on December 30) have a global reputation as one of the best live bands around.

The band’s frenetic rock sound, with its mix of Irish folk and Americana, has been described as ‘psycho ceilidh’ and ‘whiskey-soaked folk’ and is best appreciated in a live setting.

For details, tel: 8224 7831 or visit struleartscentre.co.uk.

Bagatelle

Strule Arts Centre, Omagh, Thursday, 8pm

The Irish supergroup, who are also set to play a sell-out date at Belfast’s Ulster Hall on December 29, first formed in Bray in 1978 and completed their final tour in February 2016. However, due to demand, the band have been forced to continue playing a select few gigs throughout the year rather than retire completely.

The band that inspired U2 and shared the stage with Bob Marley, Van Morrison, U2, Thin Lizzy, Don McLean and The Pogues will be reliving almost 40 years of hits, including Summer In Dublin, Second Violin, Leeson’s Street Lady and many more.

For details, tel: 8224 7831 or visit struleartscentre.co.uk.

The High Kings

Market Place Theatre, Armagh, Thursday, 8pm

Hailed as the most exciting Irish ballad group to emerge since The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem electrified the worldwide folk revival of the Sixties, the band has seen its popularity skyrocket with sell-out tours of Ireland and America.

The multi-platinum selling High Kings — Finbarr Clancy, Brian Dunphy, Martin Furey and Darren Holden — have been voted Ireland’s folk band of the year on numerous occasions.

Now, the true heirs of Ireland’s folk heritage, who play 13 instruments between them and whose singing is especially noted for close harmonies, are back on a local tour.

You can also catch The High Kings at Enniskillen’s Ardhowen Theatre (December 29) and Belfast’s Ulster Hall (December 30).

For details, tel: 3752 1821 or visit marketplacearmagh.com.

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