Belfast Telegraph

Don't fight the frizz

Why play it straight — the catwalks have gone wild for truly untamed tresses.

Hair raising: a model at the Michael Kors Collection Fall 2019 show
Hair raising: a model at the Michael Kors Collection Fall 2019 show
Phillip Lim
Oscar de la Renta
Alexa Chung

By Emma McCarthy

On the surface, the biannual fashion show circuit we are now smack-bang in the centre of is a whirlwind of fabulous blow-dries, thrice-daily outfit changes and limitless champagne.

In reality, for the fashion industry toilers who left for New York at the start of February and won't see their homes again until spring, there's little time for salon appointments - let alone a midday makeover - and the only thing that's on constant supply is caffeine.

I know, your heart bleeds. But for this season at least, the great unblow-dried find themselves in good company as frizz makes its way to the top of the catwalks' most wanted list.

In fact so popular is the unkempt look on the runway that front-row frequenters may decide to ditch their hairdryers altogether and embrace their dysfunctional 'dos with open arms.

In New York, models at 3.1 Phillip Lim sported textured, fluffy kinks that floated airily around their shoulders as they bobbed down the catwalk.

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Phillip Lim

The look, masterminded by Aveda's Gary Gill, is equally breezy to recreate: simply part straight hair into sections, spritz with Aveda's Texture Tonic and braid. Gill then speed-dried and flat-ironed the style to 'bake' it in - though exceptionally time-poor types can also just sleep in the style to set it - before brushing through the plaits to pump up the plump.

At Michael Kors's Studio 54-inspired catwalk collection, hairstylist Orlando Pita also went big on the frizz by weaving models' hair into an XL bobby pin and clamping it with a straightening iron for an effect which could also be achieved after a night spent on a sweaty dancefloor.

At Oscar de la Renta, hair by Odile Gilbert for Tresemmé was deliberately non-uniform, spanning side-parted ponies to slicked-back bobs, but the hair that was curly was wildly so, bursting into a flurry of frizz at the ends.

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Oscar de la Renta

At Mansur Gavriel's NYFW presentation, Laurent Philippon for Bumble and Bumble fished a crimping iron out of the Nineties cast-offs pile to create brushed-out fluffy kinks.

Meanwhile, back in the UK, London Fashion Week's favourite style icon-turned-designer Alexa Chung unveiled her take on "post-apocalyptic dressing" - read tightly belted trench coats and roll-necks to take cover in - with equally dishevelled 'dos. The look was described by stylist extraordinaire Alex Brownsell as having a "carefree, Alexa vibe. It's a girl who's grown up in a cult and broken out to navigate her own style".

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Alexa Chung

Naturally, the cool-girl static was created with a few simple tools: a blusher brush and a balloon, both of which were rubbed over the front of the head to exaggerate the fuzzy baby hairs. Don't fight the frizz.

© EVENING STANDARD

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