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So, how did the £359 hairdryer that looks like a vacuum cleaner perform when put to the test?

A hairdryer that costs hundreds? Sophie Goodall gives her verdict on the RevAir

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RevAir Reverse Air Dryer, £359, available from Myrevair.co.uk

RevAir Reverse Air Dryer, £359, available from Myrevair.co.uk

PA

Tress test: Sophie Goodall’s hair after using the RevAir
Reverse Air Dryer

Tress test: Sophie Goodall’s hair after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

PA

Air raising: from left, Sophie Goodall’s hair before and after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

Air raising: from left, Sophie Goodall’s hair before and after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

PA

RevAir Reverse Air Dryer, £359, available from Myrevair.co.uk

Blow-drying is essential if you want glossy locks, whether curly or straight, however, too much heat can damage your hair in no time, so is there a better alternative?

The RevAir promises smooth tresses at a lower temperature, thanks to innovative technology, but at £359 - is it really worth splashing out on?

How does the RevAir work?

The RevAir is a reverse air hairdryer. Basically, you feed your hair into a long hose, and the dryer uses 'reverse air suction technology' to suck the moisture out.

So, instead of blasting hot air at your tresses, it essentially hoovers them.

Sounds daunting, but it's said to be faster and uses less heat and energy than a standard hairdryer.

Is it difficult to set up?

Assembling the RevAir is pretty straightforward. Unlike a normal, handheld hairdryer, it consists of a base unit which attaches to a long a tube with a wand at the other end.

I'm not going to lie, it looks a lot like a vacuum cleaner, and my boyfriend asked what that 'Ghostbusters contraption' was.

It is a bit bulky, but comes with loads of additional goodies, including hair ties, sturdy sectioning grips, a soft velour turban, a product spray bottle and a handy storage bag.

There's a temperature setting on the wand - for high, low and cold blast - but even high only feels lukewarm compared to my usual hairdryer.

There's also a speed control on the base unit, meaning all hair types are catered for. Higher speeds are suitable for curly hair, but it's advised you start off slow to begin with, to prevent knotting. My hair is thick and wavy and sits just below my shoulders, so I decide to start off with a low heat and a slow speed.

How do you use the RevAir?

Trying the RevAir for the first time was a bit tricky, but I soon got the hang of it.

I began by inserting a three-inch section of hair into the wand, getting as close to the root as possible, and switching the power on.

I kept each section of hair in the wand for about 30 seconds, which I found was perfect drying time.

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Tress test: Sophie Goodall’s hair after using the RevAir
Reverse Air Dryer

Tress test: Sophie Goodall’s hair after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

PA

Tress test: Sophie Goodall’s hair after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

It took about 12 sections to get my full head dry - I would recommend sectioning off the dried parts, so you don't go back over them. Lifting the heavy tube to get to the hair on top of your head and around the back is tiring to begin with, but with practise, you learn to tip and position your head around the wand.

The verdict

After using my normal hairdryer, my hair is usually quite frizzy, static and full of volume.

However, after using the RevAir, my mane was immediately soft, smooth and sleek.

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Air raising: from left, Sophie Goodall’s hair before and after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

Air raising: from left, Sophie Goodall’s hair before and after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

PA

Air raising: from left, Sophie Goodall’s hair before and after using the RevAir Reverse Air Dryer

The only issue I had was I couldn't tip my head upside down, blast my roots and tousle my 'do for volume.

If you like beachy waves or a textured style, the RevAir may not be for you.

However, for sleek and straight styles, it's perfect.

I didn't need to grab the straighteners, as my hair was set into a really nice style just using the machine's cool temperature - and the shine is really unparalleled.

The results lasted for several days and the general health of my hair seems to be improving the more I use the dryer.

One thing's for sure: the RevAir may be pricey, but it works.

RevAir Reverse Air Dryer, £359, is available from Myrevair.co.uk

Belfast Telegraph