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A degree of uncertainty: As universities in NI adapt to the Covid-19 crisis, students and prospective undergraduates share what course of action they're considering

Should they take a year out and hope the pandemic passes or settle for a year of remote learning? Young people tell Linda Stewart they're getting a tough lesson as to what their options might be

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Changed times: Queen’s University

Changed times: Queen’s University

Tough decisions: Rebecca Sloan

Tough decisions: Rebecca Sloan

Tiernan Fitzlarkin

Tiernan Fitzlarkin

Paddi Fitzpatrick

Paddi Fitzpatrick

Ulster University’s Jordanstown campus

Ulster University’s Jordanstown campus

Matthew Clenaghan

Matthew Clenaghan

Anna Finlay

Anna Finlay

Changed times: Queen’s University

You've had your nose to the grindstone for months now, plugging away at the A-level revision - and then the exams are cancelled. That's the experience of thousands of sixth-form pupils across Northern Ireland who suddenly find themselves in limbo, wondering whether they will get into the courses they have applied for. And even if they do get onto their chosen courses, student life in the near future is likely to look very different from what they had imagined.

Gone will be the packed lecture theatres and thronged students' unions. Instead, freshers may find themselves, rather disappointingly, still perched in front of the laptop in their bedrooms at home, wondering just when independent life is going to start for them.

While Russell Group universities have promised their campuses will be open this autumn, more than half say their teaching has already moved online or they're preparing for a hybrid of online and face-to-face teaching in the next university year.