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Behind the headlines: How Northern Ireland's TV news anchors maintain that bond of trust with viewers

They bring the big stories into our living rooms every night. But how do Northern Ireland's TV news anchors maintain that bond of trust with viewers? Ralph Hewitt reports

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Tara Mills

Tara Mills

Paul Clark reporting from Helmand headquarters

Paul Clark reporting from Helmand headquarters

Rose Neill

Rose Neill

Noel Thompson

Noel Thompson

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Tara Mills

They bring us bad news each day, every day - but still hold a special place in the hearts of TV viewers everywhere. Northern Ireland's news readers have been with us through some of the darkest times in our history. The small group of people trusted to front the news on our screens each night have become household names, almost as high profile as those they report on.

They have been tasked with breaking the news in some of the biggest moments in history, so we ask them why the public has such an affinity with newsreaders?

Former ITV News anchor Dermot Murnaghan announced the death of Princess Diana live on air in 1997, while Trevor McDonald reported on the 1988 murders of corporals Derek Howes and David Wood at an IRA funeral in west Belfast. It was BBC News' Nicholas Witchell who brought us the news of the signing of the Good Friday Agreement in 1998.


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