| 11.2°C Belfast

Close

Premium

Dad's death at just 57 prompted Declan Lawn to give up journalism to pen scripts for TV... now he's co-writer on top BBC drama The Salisbury Poisonings

Declan Lawn was an investigative reporter for Panorama and Spotlight, but dreamt of being a screenwriter. He tells David O'Dornan about the family tragedy that persuaded him to quit a steady job - and how his wife supported him every step of the way

Close

Declan Lawn

Declan Lawn

Natalie Klamar and Wayne Swann in The Salisbury Poisonings

Natalie Klamar and Wayne Swann in The Salisbury Poisonings

BBC/Dancing Ledge/James Pardon

A scene from The Salisbury Poisonings

A scene from The Salisbury Poisonings

BBC/Dancing Ledge/James Pardon

The Salisbury Poisonings

The Salisbury Poisonings

BBC/Dancing Ledge/Huw John

Declan with screenwriting partner Adam Patterson

Declan with screenwriting partner Adam Patterson

Rafe Spall

Rafe Spall

BBC/Dancing Ledge/James Pardon

Sergei Skripal

Sergei Skripal

Yulia Skripal

Yulia Skripal

Dawn Sturgess

Dawn Sturgess

Declan Lawn

Don't give up the day job is a well-worn joke, but the truth is not many people choose to walk away from a steady income and take a risk to follow their dreams.Declan Lawn had already built a formidable reputation as an investigative journalist at the BBC, making programmes for Panorama and Spotlight, when he decided to make a life-changing leap of faith.

He had always harboured a dream to be a screenwriter and, after years of believing in his destiny despite knock-backs along the road, he and his writing partner Adam Patterson will see their real-life drama The Salisbury Poisonings on the small screen this weekend.

The primetime three-part series, starring Shameless actress Anne-Marie Duff, will run for three consecutive nights on BBC1 and is proof positive that Declan's career switching gamble paid off.