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For fork’s sake: Why table manners are lost on younger generations

With new research revealing younger generations think dining etiquette is a thing of the past, Katy McGuinness looks at why our standards have slipped

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Therese McCullagh-Melia teaches dining etiquette to TY groups all over the country. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Therese McCullagh-Melia teaches dining etiquette to TY groups all over the country. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Your phone should not be on the table unless you are expecting an important call. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Your phone should not be on the table unless you are expecting an important call. Photo: Steve Humphreys

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Therese McCullagh-Melia teaches dining etiquette to TY groups all over the country. Photo: Steve Humphreys

‘Mabel, Mabel, strong and able, keep your elbows off the table, this is not a horse’s stable, but a first-class dining table.’ If you know the rhyme, chances are you grew up in a household where table manners were non-negotiable.

You were brought up not to start eating until everyone else had been served, never to speak with your mouth full and to be sure to push your spoon away from you while you were eating (never drinking) your soup.


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