| 16.2°C Belfast

Close

Premium


Government plans for a South African-style truth commission in NI not the panacea they’re made out to be

Nuala O'Loan


Close

Process: South African President Nelson Mandela receives five volumes of Truth and Reconciliation Commission final report from Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Credit: Walter Dhladhla/AFP via Getty Images

Process: South African President Nelson Mandela receives five volumes of Truth and Reconciliation Commission final report from Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Credit: Walter Dhladhla/AFP via Getty Images

AFP via Getty Images

Truth: Former Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland Nuala O’Loan. Credit: Paul Faith

Truth: Former Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland Nuala O’Loan. Credit: Paul Faith

/

Process: South African President Nelson Mandela receives five volumes of Truth and Reconciliation Commission final report from Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Credit: Walter Dhladhla/AFP via Getty Images

In 1993, the great American writer and civil rights activist Maya Angelou wrote that “History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be un-lived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.”

Northern Ireland has been trying to find ways to face its past for decades now. In 2020, the New Decade, New Approach Agreement between the British and Irish governments provided that the British Government would, within 100 days, publish and introduce legislation in the UK Parliament to implement the Stormont House Agreement, to address Northern Ireland legacy issues.


Top Videos



Privacy