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Martina Purdy: 'If you'd told me I would be entering a convent two doors away from where I interviewed Gerry Adams, I would have laughed in your face'

In conversation with Martina Purdy

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Career change: Martina Purdy left journalism for a life in the Adoration Convent in Belfast

Career change: Martina Purdy left journalism for a life in the Adoration Convent in Belfast

Career change: Martina Purdy left journalism for a life in the Adoration Convent in Belfast

Career change: Martina Purdy left journalism for a life in the Adoration Convent in Belfast

Career change: Martina Purdy left journalism for a life in the Adoration Convent in Belfast

Martina Purdy is a former journalist, former trainee nun and now public relations officer for the St Patrick Centre in Downpatrick.

Q. Can you tell us something about your background?

A. I was born in Belfast in 1965. My father, Albert (Al), was from Eastwood in Nottinghamshire and he met my mother at a dance in Belfast in 1962 when he was doing his national service in Holywood, Co Down. My mother, Margaret (nee Logan), a Belfast woman, was a full-time homemaker and my father was an elevator mechanic. I am one of four children and have three brothers, all of whom live in Toronto, Canada. My family emigrated there in 1971 due to the Troubles. I briefly attended Holy Child school in Andersonstown, but most of my education was completed in Canada. I went to Holy Redeemer School, then St Joseph's Morrow Park (secondary school). I earned a BA in international relations at the University of Toronto and a post-grad diploma from the Ryerson School of Journalism in Toronto.