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Replacing a broken cooker which blew up and helping with household bills... how charity Bryson came to aid of families struggling during the pandemic

Bryson Charitable Group has invested £250,000 of its reserves into an emergency fund to channel food, finance and emotional support to those most severely affected by the coronavirus outbreak. Linda Stewart speaks to four people who have been helped by the Bryson Fund lifeline

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Panic attacks: Ashley Armstrong with partner Edward, Carter (15), Mark (15, back) Aaron (11) and Sophie (14)

Panic attacks: Ashley Armstrong with partner Edward, Carter (15), Mark (15, back) Aaron (11) and Sophie (14)

Ashley Armstrong and partner Edward

Ashley Armstrong and partner Edward

Hostel home: Sahra Mahamuud

Hostel home: Sahra Mahamuud

Daughters Hana (13), Hayaam (11) and Hala (6)

Daughters Hana (13), Hayaam (11) and Hala (6)

Harun (1)

Harun (1)

Struggling through: Laura Orr has been having counselling for anxiety

Struggling through: Laura Orr has been having counselling for anxiety

Panic attacks: Ashley Armstrong with partner Edward, Carter (15), Mark (15, back) Aaron (11) and Sophie (14)

Even at the best of times, growing youngsters can get through quite an unbelievable amount of food. Add to that a global pandemic and a lockdown that keeps them confined to the house almost 24/7, and the food bills rise sharply.

For Ashley Armstrong (34) from Ballyduff in Newtownabbey, it was tough enough trying to provide for four hungry teenagers, but it was the cooker that really brought sleepless nights.

"In the midst of it all, my cooker blew up," she says.