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Sugar rush: the truth about E numbers and hyperactivity

As the European Food Safety Authority bans titanium dioxide from its safe list, dietitian Orla Walsh gives the lowdown on how to decipher food packaging, cut down on hidden sugars in your family’s diet, and balance ‘sometimes foods’ with great nutrition

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Titanium dioxide is used to help produce those bright rainbow hues

Titanium dioxide is used to help produce those bright rainbow hues

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Orla Walsh believes helping kids get the right nutritional balance could influence future generations

Orla Walsh believes helping kids get the right nutritional balance could influence future generations

Natural sugars in fruit are better than free sugars added to biscuits and cakes

Natural sugars in fruit are better than free sugars added to biscuits and cakes

Getty Images

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Titanium dioxide is used to help produce those bright rainbow hues

Last month, news of a new class action lawsuit against the Mars Corporation over claims their use of titanium dioxide — which is used to help produce those rainbow hues in Skittles — left a bad taste in the mouths of many and caused quite a frenzy online.

A resident of San Leandro in California is alleging that people who consume Skittles “are at heightened risk of a host of health effects for which they were unaware stemming from genotoxicity — the ability of a chemical substance to change DNA”. According to a spokesperson for Mars, the additive has not been used in the EU version of the sweets or in any other EU products since 2020.


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