Belfast Telegraph

Video: Million pound mansion for sale in Northern Ireland once hosted Queen Victoria

Victoria House in Rostrevor
Victoria House in Rostrevor
Some of the rooms which include an indoor swimming pool
Some of the rooms which include an indoor swimming pool
Some of the rooms which include an indoor swimming pool
Some of the rooms which include an indoor swimming pool
Some of the rooms which include an indoor swimming pool
Allan Preston

By Allan Preston

A luxury six-bedroom mansion in Co Down once visited by Queen Victoria has gone on the market with a price tag of £1.15m.

Victoria House in Rostrevor was built in the mid-1890s for the Girls' Friendly Society in Ireland, a charity for young women.

It was originally known as the 'House of Rest' and a 'home of rest for sick and weary members'.

In 1900, the long-reigning monarch visited Dublin and the new hostel in Rostrevor which was then named after her as a memorial of her visit.

After the Second World War, the house closed in 1954 before reopening as Glencairn Guest House. It was later restored and extended for use as a family home which today boasts an indoor swimming pool.

Estate agents Simon Brien Residential have described the property as "undoubtedly one of the most significant family homes presented to the market within recent years".

Boasting panoramic views of Carlingford Lough, the house is set out over three floors, with extensive accommodation including six en suite bedrooms.

Any new owner can enjoy not only the swimming pool, but also a Jacuzzi, sauna and shower rooms.

Elsewhere the "magnificent" reception rooms include a formal drawing room, dining room and family room.

Other features include a granny flat, detached triple garage, generous space for parking, and a greenhouse.

Transport links are also listed as a key selling point, with improved road links and the railway in Newry making Belfast and Dublin accessible within an hour, as well as a ferry connecting Greencastle and Greenore.

The Girls' Friendly Society was originally founded in London in 1875 by an Irishwoman, Mrs (Mary) Elizabeth Townsend.

The first organisation of its kind in the Church of England, it was intended to help country girls find work in the city by teaching them skills to gain employment.

The movement soon spread to Ireland, Scotland and America by 1877 and was also established in Australia. Today, the charity has 80 branches across Ireland.

Further property information can be found at www.simonbrien.com or by calling 028 9066 8888

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