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'A Life In Colour', a rainbow world through the eyes of Attenborough

Inspired by a new two-part series, A Life In Colour, Sarah Marshall rounds up some of nature's most dazzling displays

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Face colours of male mandrill baboons signal their status.

Face colours of male mandrill baboons signal their status.

Press Association Images

Poison dart frog in Panama.

Poison dart frog in Panama.

Press Association Images

Andean flamingos dance on the salt pans in the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Andean flamingos dance on the salt pans in the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Press Association Images

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Face colours of male mandrill baboons signal their status.

Since the early days of his career, Sir David Attenborough has been eager to make a TV programme about animals and their use of colour. But the limitations of black and white TV sets all those years ago led him to put the idea on hold.

Finally, he's been given the opportunity to indulge in nature's powerful palette with new two-part BBC One series, A Life In Colour. Looking at the use of different colours as defence mechanisms, courtship tools and a means of displaying dominance, the programme travels from the rainforests of Costa Rica to the snowy slopes of Scotland.

In all their technicolour glory, nature's best-dressed superstars are even more appealing. These are a few of the blinding acts set to dazzle on screen.


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