Belfast Telegraph

Home News Brexit

Northern Ireland rejects hard border - and 62% say united Ireland more likely after Brexit

By Victoria Leonard

Six in 10 people here and eight out of 10 in the Irish Republic believe that the UK should not proceed with Brexit if it means a hard border in Ireland, according to a cross-border survey.

The survey was jointly commissioned by BBC NI's Nolan Live and RTE's Claire Byrne Live programmes, which broadcast the results simultaneously last night.

Over 1,000 adults aged 18 or over were surveyed here, and another 1,000 adults in the Republic.

The findings indicated that a clear majority of those who responded in Northern Ireland and the Republic believe the UK should not proceed with Brexit if it means a hard border.

In Northern Ireland, 61% of respondents answered no to a question about whether the UK should proceed with Brexit in the event of a deal including a hard border.

Just over a third (36%) here supported Brexit going forward even in the event of a hard border, while 3% were undecided.

In the Republic, the balance was even more decisively set against leaving in the event of a hard border, with some 83% saying they would oppose going forward with leaving the EU in this scenario.

Just one in 10 said the process should carry on even in the event of a hard border.

However, 7% of respondents in the south were undecided.

Meanwhile, some 62% of respondents in Northern Ireland said they believe Brexit makes a united Ireland a more likely possibility - a view shared by just over a third (35%) of respondents in the Republic.

But 11% of respondents here believed it made a united Ireland less likely, with nearly a quarter (24%) saying it wouldn't make a difference and 3% saying they didn't know.

In the Republic, nearly a third (32%) said they felt Brexit would make a united Ireland less likely, while 22% said Brexit would not make it more or less likely, and 11% said they didn't know.

The statistics also gave an insight into people's perceptions of how Brexit would affect their own financial situation.

Over half (55%) of respondents in Northern Ireland said they feared they would be worse off, with 9% saying they felt they would be better off and 7% saying they didn't know.

In addition, 29% responded by saying they thought Brexit would make no difference to their finances.

In the Republic of Ireland, just over a third (34%) of respondents believed they'd be worse off due to Brexit, with 2% believing they'd be better off and 44% saying it would make no difference.

But a fifth (20%) of respondents in the Republic were unsure how Brexit would affect their financial situation.

The survey also dealt with attitudes towards holding a second Brexit referendum.

In Northern Ireland, the survey showed that in the event of a UK and EU deal on the terms of Brexit, 58% of respondents believed there should be a second referendum.

In contrast, 38% of people said there should not be a second Brexit referendum in these circumstances, while 4% were undecided.

However, in the Republic, over three quarters (77%) of people felt a second referendum would be needed in this case, with just 14% saying no and 9% undecided.

Belfast Telegraph

Daily News Headlines Newsletter

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox.

Popular

From Belfast Telegraph