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Ammunition and ‘Mass card from INLA’ found at home of north Belfast stabbing accused

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A judge refused to change the accused's bail conditions and he remains in custody. Pic: Peter Morrison

A judge refused to change the accused's bail conditions and he remains in custody. Pic: Peter Morrison

A judge refused to change the accused's bail conditions and he remains in custody. Pic: Peter Morrison

A car valet accused of trying to stab a man to death on a north Belfast street allegedly had ammunition and a Mass card from the INLA, the High Court has heard.

Prosecutors claimed the bullet and paramilitary-inscribed leaflet were discovered when police searched 30-year-old Anthony Harrison’s home after the alleged knife attack last month.

Harrison, of Brookhill Avenue in the city, is one of two men charged with attempted murder in connection with the incident on Easter Monday.

The victim, aged in his thirties, was stabbed repeatedly in the abdomen and struck with a wax candle burner in the Clifton Drive and Cliftonville Road area.

He was critically injured and suffered life-changing injuries, according to police.

With Harrison accused of carrying out the stabbing, police searched his home, seizing clothing, suspected drugs and cash.

Iryna Kennedy, prosecuting, also disclosed: “A round of ammunition and a Mass card purporting to be from the INLA was also found.”

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A defence lawyer claimed the leaflet and bullet were sent to Harrison as part of a paramilitary threat against him.

He faces further charges of possessing a blade in public, having quantities of cannabis and diazepam, and possessing ammunition in suspicious circumstances.

Harrison denies involvement in the attack and was previously granted bail but remains in custody due to a prohibition on entering parts of north Belfast.

Defence barrister Richard McConkey urged the High Court to relax the exclusion zone so his client can move in with his sister and her children.

“He is described as their favourite uncle,” Mr McConkey said.

Opposing the application, Mrs Kennedy argued: “There is a high level of public disquiet, the exclusion zone was identified as appropriate.”

Following submissions Mr Justice O’Hara refused to vary the bail terms.

The judge said: “He (Harrison) will have to find somewhere else, I’m afraid.” 


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