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A-Level results: We will be flexible with students: NI universities

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Queen’s University says it will be cognisant of students’ issues

Queen’s University says it will be cognisant of students’ issues

Queen’s University says it will be cognisant of students’ issues

Both Queen's and Ulster University have said they are willing to work with students to allow them to access higher education after estimated grades were lowered by exam boards.

Over a third of 25,000 A and AS Level pupils got lesser grades than their teachers had estimated and only 5.3% had theirs raised.

All exams were cancelled earlier this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Grades were instead calculated through teacher assessments and a computer-generated 'standardisation' model used by Northern Ireland's exams board CCEA, however the body has recognised that there will be "anomalies" in the results.

This has led to fears that many young people will miss out on a place at university due to the method of calculating the exam results.

Queen's University Belfast has said that it will honour all offers based on the results provided and that it will take into account appeals processes.

"Queen's University recognises that the process by which results are being determined this year is causing additional anxiety for some students," said the spokesperson. "The university will honour all offers on the basis of the results provided by the relevant exam boards and is committed to providing as much flexibility as possible within existing parameters to maximise the number of students able to access higher education in what has been a very challenging year.

"This flexibility includes working with exam boards and students to take account of subsequent appeal processes as far as possible in advance of the start of the new academic year."

Meanwhile, Ulster University will also honour all of the course offers it had previously made and was committed to being as "flexible as possible".

"At Ulster University, we are honouring all offers made on the basis of the results provided by the relevant exam boards and in this very challenging year for students we are committed to remaining as flexible as possible to ensure that all those who wish to access higher education are provided with an opportunity to do so," a spokesperson said.

"Students can call the Ulster admissions helpline where an advisor will provide them with the support and advice they need to make an informed decision," the university added.

"Students can also access a range of options available through clearing on courses such as Animation, Business, Cinematic Arts, Computing Technologies, Biomedical Sciences, Artificial Intelligence, Drama, Interactive Design, Photography, Fashion, Journalism, Law and more."

Belfast Telegraph