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Dr Steve Myers returns to Queen's University Belfast for Large Hadron Collider and Higgs Boson lecture

'Steve Myers is the man who made the Large Hadron Collider work'
'Steve Myers is the man who made the Large Hadron Collider work'
Large Hadron Collider
View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN near Geneva
Employees inspect the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, on Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)
Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)
Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)
View of the LHC (large hadron collider) in its tunnel at CERN (European particle physics laboratory) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The LHC is a 27-kilometre-long underground ring of superconducting magnets housed in this pipe-like structure or cryostat. The cryostat is cooled by liquid helium to keep it at an operating temperature just above absolute zero. It will accelerate two counter-rotating beam of protons to an energy of 7 tera electron volts (TeV) and then bring them to collide head on. Several detectors are being built around the LHC to detect the various particles produced by the collision. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)
**FILE**This March 22, 2007 file photo, shows the magnet core of the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet (CMS, Compact Muon Solenoid) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)'s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, which is scheduled to be switched on in November, in Geneva, Switzerland. Some 2,000 scientists from 155 institutes in 36 countries are working together to build the CMS particle detector. (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, file)
Spectators look at the ATLAS detector construction (a Toroidal LHC Apparatus) at the CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) near Geneva, Switzerland, Thursday, May 31, 2007. The detector will be placed around the large hadron collider (LHC), CERN's highest energy particle accelerator. ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to measure the broadest possible range of particles and physical processes that could result from the collision of the proton beams within the LHC. A pilot run of the LHC is scheduled for summer 2007. (KEYSTONE/Martial Trezzini)

BY AMANDA FERGUSON

A Belfast-born scientist who helped discover the so-called 'God Particle' is to return to the city to deliver a lecture on his work.

Dr Steve Myers will talk about The Large Hadron Collider And The Discovery Of The Higgs Boson at Queen's University Belfast on April 2 at 7.30pm.

Dr Myers, who is from Belfast and studied at Queen's, is in charge of all machines at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research), including the famous Large Hadron Collider.

It made possible the recent discovery of Higgs Boson, the so-called 'God Particle', which gives mass to all matter in the universe.

John Womersley of the Science and Technology Facilities Council said: "Steve Myers is the man who made the Large Hadron Collider work."

Further reading

Thousands sign up for Higgs course

Queen's University Belfast scientists solve riddle of brightest exploding stars in the universe

Evidence for 'New Physics' universe

Nuclear physics goes pear shaped: CERN scientists show some atomic nuclei are stubby and lopsided

Cern physicists: We found Higgs boson with Large Hadron Collider

Large Hadron Collider scientists claim Higgs boson God particle find 

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