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Coronavirus Northern Ireland: Cases continue to climb as further 627 reported in 24 hours

  • Death toll remains at 2,156
  • Another 627 people test positive
  • Chief Medical Officer warns health service is facing a ‘very difficult winter’

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A mobile vaccine clinic has opened in the Whitla Hall at Queen's University, Belfast, as part of a continued push to give a vaccine to everyone aged 18 and over. Photograph by Declan Roughan / Press Eye

A mobile vaccine clinic has opened in the Whitla Hall at Queen's University, Belfast, as part of a continued push to give a vaccine to everyone aged 18 and over. Photograph by Declan Roughan / Press Eye

Sir Michael McBride.

Sir Michael McBride.

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A mobile vaccine clinic has opened in the Whitla Hall at Queen's University, Belfast, as part of a continued push to give a vaccine to everyone aged 18 and over. Photograph by Declan Roughan / Press Eye

Positive Covid-19 cases continue to skyrocket after the Department of Health reported another 627 in the past 24 hours.

It is the highest number of daily cases since January 26.

There has been 3,257 positive cases in the last week, up from 2,122 in the previous seven days - a jump of 1,135.

The figures were compiled in the 24 hours up to 10am on Thursday.

The death toll remains at 2,156 in Northern Ireland since the outbreak began as no further deaths were reported.

Hospital occupancy is at 105% with 3,242 people in beds. There are three patients with Covid-19 in intensive care and a total of 48 in hospital.

And nine care homes are dealing with an outbreak of the virus.

As of 12pm on Thursday, 1,179,096 people in Northern Ireland have received their first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine, while 920,078 have been given their second.

Meanwhile, the health service is facing a "very difficult winter", Northern Ireland's Chief Medical Officer has warned, as cases of Covid-19 are expected to surge over the coming weeks.

Sir Michael McBride said hundreds of coronavirus hospital admissions will lead to a "perfect storm" of additional pressures on the system.

He told the Assembly's Health Committee that frontline medical staff have said it feels like the middle of winter as they prepare to deal with a sharp increase in Covid cases.

"Clearly, any additional admissions over and above the current level of activity will put significant pressures on the health service," Sir Michael said.

"It feels like the middle of winter at this present moment in time.

"If you're in discussion with our frontline staff, you will know that and hear that from them.

"That's on the back of a very long, very difficult past 18 months. Staff are physically tired and exhausted.

"I think that's something that we all must bear in mind."


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