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Coronavirus: Putting up dual-language road signage is 'an essential service' insists Mid Ulster District council

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One of the dual-language street signs erected in Castlecaulfield

One of the dual-language street signs erected in Castlecaulfield

One of the dual-language street signs erected in Castlecaulfield

Mid Ulster District Council has confirmed it considers the erection of dual-language road signs as an "essential service" during the pandemic.

It also confirmed that during the erection of two dual-language signs in Castlecaulfield last week, social distancing measures were adhered to.

Two street signs on the Annaghmakeown Road in the Co Tyrone village have been replaced with signs displaying the Irish language street name on top and the English language street name below, in accordance with council guidelines.

Many had assumed that with the Stormont Executive advising only essential works should be carried out at this time, dual-language signs would have to wait.

However, a spokesperson for Mid Ulster District Council confirmed the council considers such work essential.

"Where resources and social distancing restrictions allow, we have continued to deliver services, from grass-cutting and litter picking to property management activity," said the spokesman.

"This includes the erection of street name plates which had previously been agreed, ordered and received into stock. Two were erected on the Annaghmakeown Road at a cost of £80."

A survey for these street signs was issued on November 8 last year. A total of 71 surveys were issued. In total, 40 surveys were returned with 38 considered valid. There were only 10 objections to the proposal, with 28 of the surveys returned in favour of the introduction of dual-language street signs.

This meant that 74% of responses were in favour of the proposal and, in accordance with council policy, the signs were erected.

Belfast Telegraph