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Recovered lawyer Niall Murphy claps for carers after 16 days in coma

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Niall Murphy applauds the NHS and frontline staff with his family

Niall Murphy applauds the NHS and frontline staff with his family

A piper plays for staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast

A piper plays for staff at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast

Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph

Niall Murphy applauds the NHS and frontline staff with his family

Prominent human rights lawyer Niall Murphy was last night on his doorstep clapping for the carers who nursed him back to health during his battle with coronavirus.

Mr Murphy spent 16 days in a coma with coronavirus and was given just a 50% chance of surviving.

Now back with his wife Marie and their three children, aged between 12 and 7, Mr Murphy told RTE's Morning Ireland yesterday that he is "one of the lucky ones and very conscious that people aren't making it".

He is recovering at his Belfast home with his family and joined the nation who came together last night at 8pm to clap for the carers battling on the frontline against Covid-19.

Now in its fifth week, the national Clap for Carers sees people line the streets up and down the country to show their support and gratitude for key workers facing down the virus each day.

Last night a piper played at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast to recognise and acknowledge the public support.

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A piper plays for NHS staff at the RVH in Belfast as Northern Ireland claps for the NHS  on April 23rd 2020 (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

A piper plays for NHS staff at the RVH in Belfast as Northern Ireland claps for the NHS on April 23rd 2020 (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

Kevin Scott / Belfast Telegraph

A piper plays for NHS staff at the RVH in Belfast as Northern Ireland claps for the NHS on April 23rd 2020 (Photo by Kevin Scott for Belfast Telegraph)

At Daisy Hill hospital in Newry, a convoy of dozens of buses drove past and sounded their horns in appreciation of healthcare workers.

Nurses and doctors, some joined by family members, came out of the hospital to watch the noisy thank-you from Translink drivers. Several bagpipers from the Bessbrook Crimson Arrow band also played outside the front entrance at 8pm.

Healthcare workers across Northern Ireland have spoken of the inspiration and motivation the now weekly Clap for Carers gives them.

Martina Finn, a specialist nurse at the Ulster Hospital, said it was "overwhelming" to see so many come out each week to show their support especially in her own neighbourhood.

Meanwhile, Unison, the Royal College of Nursing Northern Ireland and the Royal College of Midwives Northern Ireland have launched a joint campaign calling on people to observe a minute's silence on Tuesday, April 28 to remember all the health, care and other key workers who have lost their lives to coronavirus across the UK and Ireland in a tribute at 11am. The minute's silence will allow everyone to pay their respects and give thanks for the lives of those whose work involved caring, saving lives and keeping key services running.

Belfast Telegraph