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Satellite image showing ash billowing from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland

Satellite image showing ash billowing from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland

A plume of ash from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier covers a farm in Thorvaldseyri, Iceland

A plume of ash from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier covers a farm in Thorvaldseyri, Iceland

The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air

The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air

Brynjar Gauti

An infrared image shows Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano

An infrared image shows Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano

The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air. (AP)

The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier sends ash into the air. (AP)

This frame grab from APTN shows the volcano near the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier, the fifth largest glacier in Iceland, as it begins erupting early Sunday morning March 21, 2010. Fearing flooding from the glacier melt, authorities evacuated some 400 people in the area 160 kilometers (100 miles) southeast of the capital, Reykjavik, as a precaution but no damage or injuries have been reported according to authorities. The last time the volcano erupted was in the 1820s. (AP Photo/APTN)

This frame grab from APTN shows the volcano near the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier, the fifth largest glacier in Iceland, as it begins erupting early Sunday morning March 21, 2010. Fearing flooding from the glacier melt, authorities evacuated some 400 people in the area 160 kilometers (100 miles) southeast of the capital, Reykjavik, as a precaution but no damage or injuries have been reported according to authorities. The last time the volcano erupted was in the 1820s. (AP Photo/APTN)

Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier

Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier

Ragnar Axelsson

Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier

Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier

Ragnar Axelsson

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Satellite image showing ash billowing from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland

Flight restrictions have been lifted at Northern Ireland's airports after wind blew ash from an erupting Icelandic volcano above the UK Passengers suffering ash cloud-caused delays were given some respite today when flight restrictions at Northern Ireland's airports were lifted.

Flights were able to operate from 1.00pm but cancellations and delays are still a possibility with passengers being advised to check with their airline.

Flights to and from Dublin Airport resumed at noon.

Restrictions that had been in place at London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports were lifted around 11am. The two airports had remained shut until 7am this morning after the Icelandic ash cloud had again caused havoc to flights in and out of the UK.

Even after the 7am reopening, Heathrow and Gatwick passengers had endured severe disruption to services due to their close proximity to the no-fly zone.

But around 11am, air traffic control service Nats said the Civil Aviation Authority had lifted the no-fly zone that had been affecting flights at Heathrow and Gatwick.

It added: "The decision comes following further information from the Met Office about the nature and location of the ash cloud."

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The no-fly zone remains in place only in the Orkney and Shetland Islands.


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