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App maps Troubles 'killing fields' of Fermanagh

Border Trail Tour shows where over 100 lost lives

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Kenny Donaldson

Kenny Donaldson

A map of the incidents in the Enniskillen area

A map of the incidents in the Enniskillen area

Kenny Donaldson

A smartphone app dubbed The Killing Fields is being launched to pinpoint the scenes of more than 100 of the Troubles' most vicious terror outrages.

It is being developed by victims organisation the South East Fermanagh Foundation, whose motto is: "I'll never forget."

Head of the SEFF Kenny Donaldson said the app is not only being developed as a reference for tourists and locals.

It will supplement the experience of those taking the SEFF Border Trail tour, which visits the sites of some of Co Fermanagh's most horrific paramilitary murders.

Mr Donaldson said: "Our Border Trail tour has been running for some time and we thought it was time to augment the experience with an app. Across Co Fermanagh, 112 people were killed as a result of terrorism in the Troubles. The Border Trail tour in conjunction with the app will bring these attacks vividly to life and show the deep hurts inflicted on communities by telling people exactly what happened, where and why.

"It will also show there are still generations of victims of terrorism who need help and support."

SEFF say their Border Trail walk highlights how Fermanagh was a 'killing field' area during the Troubles. One of the most notorious attacks was the IRA's 1987 Enniskillen Remembrance Day bomb, which killed 11 and injured 63 others.

The Border Trail tour and its upcoming app includes a forensic history of more than 100 other attacks in the area, including shootings of police officers and families.

Mr Donaldson's SEFF group says in a promotion for its Border Trail tour: "This allows you to pay tribute to the memory and walk respectfully in the footsteps of some of those individuals, who perished at the hands of terrorists during the Northern Ireland Troubles.

"Mapping incidents in this border location of south-east Fermanagh helps to paint a graphically visual and educational interpretation of recent past events, embedding each memory of loss and trauma into the rural landscape.

"These atrocities and the fear of further attacks forced an exodus of Protestant farmers from the border area."

Belfast Telegraph