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BBC's Stephen Nolan puts Twitter trolls 'who should know better' on notice he will fight back

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Stephen Nolan says he worries for others being affected by online abuse

Stephen Nolan says he worries for others being affected by online abuse

Stephen Nolan says he worries for others being affected by online abuse

BBC broadcaster Stephen Nolan has put social media trolls on notice he will be fighting back, saying "if it costs them 20 grand, good luck to them".

During a segment on his Radio Ulster mid-morning programme, the presenter said he was considering changing his tactics on how he normally deals with abuse.

"There are a couple of people at the moment, they should know better, they've got money, they have got the resources and I might just take it off them and give it to charity and teach them a lesson," he said.

"I've got a good lawyer.

"Tell you what if they want to send a tweet about me and it costs 20 grand. Good luck to you - it might stop them doing it to someone else."

Mr Nolan has often spoken of how he "treasures and appreciates" a close connection with the public on Twitter. In the past he has said how the vast majority offer support, love and banter.

But he said there was a "vile underbelly" of people on social media who thought it was ok to dish out abuse.

Maybe they need to be taught a lesson, they cannot abuse people in this way, tell lies about them and get away with it. Stephen Nolan

Over the weekend he screen grabbed a post from an anonymous account in which they replied to a news tweet about the confirmed case of coronavirus in NI and how they hoped it was Mr Nolan who had the illness.

"I don't know how to reply to this," Mr Nolan said.

On his show on Tuesday he said he either ignored the abuse, or retweeted it to "expose the idiot".

"Some of it is getting so vile about me - I actually think I might sue a few people," he told his listeners.

"The reason I am hesitant about suing anybody ... I have good lawyers money and all of that and I don't want to inflict any unnecessary stress, or strain or financial hardship on anybody.

"You get to the stage that if it is happening to you so often that you think, you have got to fight back somehow."

One caller put it to him it was not worth giving the trolls the attention they craved.

He said no matter what anyone's job was they were entitled to protection from "what is the wild west of Twitter".

"When I said 'good luck' to those that find themselves sued I don't mean it, I mean the opposite," he added.

"Maybe they need to be taught a lesson, they cannot abuse people in this way, tell lies about them and get away with it."

Belfast Telegraph