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Belfast Lord Mayor sets example with second-hand clothes effort as fashion industry shifts its focus

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Belfast Lord Mayor Kate Nicholl wears a top purchased from a Belfast Oxfam shop

Belfast Lord Mayor Kate Nicholl wears a top purchased from a Belfast Oxfam shop

Belfast Lord Mayor Kate Nicholl wears this second-hand dress from Belfast clothing shop Daja Vu

Belfast Lord Mayor Kate Nicholl wears this second-hand dress from Belfast clothing shop Daja Vu

The Belfast Lord Mayor met Irish President Michael D Higgins in a borrowed black dress styled with a jacket bought from a Marie Curie charity shop, for a national remembrance service in Dublin

The Belfast Lord Mayor met Irish President Michael D Higgins in a borrowed black dress styled with a jacket bought from a Marie Curie charity shop, for a national remembrance service in Dublin

Cathy Martin wearing an outfit she bought from eBay

Cathy Martin wearing an outfit she bought from eBay

Fashion expert Cathy Martin

Fashion expert Cathy Martin

Cathy wearing a top from Zara which was bought on eBay

Cathy wearing a top from Zara which was bought on eBay

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Belfast Lord Mayor Kate Nicholl wears a top purchased from a Belfast Oxfam shop

The time has come for fast fashion to slow down.

With the rise of online platforms such as Depop, e-Bay and Vestiaire Collective, who promote the ethos of reusing and rehoming preloved clothes rather than buying new, the fashion industry has seen a shift to a more ethical outlook on sustainability; whether it be designing better quality clothing, promoting a fairer wage for workers or focusing on reducing waste.


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