Belfast Telegraph

Belfast-based academic's radiocarbon work to improve accuracy for archaeologists, environmental scientists and climate researchers

Anna Maguire

A Belfast-based academic could hold the keys to history.

Queen's academic, Professor Paula Reimer has pioneered a method of accurately dating landmark events in history.

The internationally-recognised radiocarbon calibration curve will enable researchers to reliably date landmark archaeological finds, from the bones of King Richard III uncovered under a car park in Leicester, to prehistoric remains preserved in permafrost in Siberia.

The curve will provide improved accuracy for archaeologists, environmental scientists and climate researchers who already use radiocarbon dating to date their findings.

It will also be used by various agencies, including the International Panel on Climate Change, to place historic environments.

More than 30 scientists from Queen's University and the University of Sheffield were involved in the development, which took 15 years of research and studies carried out by scientists worldwide.

Radiocarbon dating is one of the most widely-used scientific methods in archaeology and environmental science.

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