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Blain McGuigan questioned over unaccounted £20k ticket sales and missing proof he was Frampton promoter

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Blain McGuigan, a director of Cyclone Promotions and the son of former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan, arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Blain McGuigan, a director of Cyclone Promotions and the son of former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan, arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion boxer Carl Frampton arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion boxer Carl Frampton arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan arrives at Belfast High. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan arrives at Belfast High. Pic Stephen Davison

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Blain McGuigan, a director of Cyclone Promotions and the son of former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan, arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

There was no documentation to prove Blain McGuigan was the promoter in two of Carl Frampton’s big Belfast fights, the High Court has been told.

The eldest son of Mr Frampton’s former manager Barry McGuigan was also questioned about almost £21,000 in ticket sales that were allegedly unaccounted for.

Mr Frampton, a dual-weight world boxing champion, is suing Barry McGuigan and Cyclone Promotions for £6m alleged withheld earnings.

In a counter-suit, Barry McGuigan is claiming £4m against his one-time protege for breach of contract when he ended their partnership in 2017.

Both men deny the respective allegations against them.

On day 17 of the legal battle between the two former world champions Blaine McGuigan was accused by counsel for Mr Frampton, Gavin Millar QC, of being unable to produce any documentation which showed that he had acted as promoter for the Belfast boxer’s fights with Hugo Cazares in and Kiko Martinez in 2014.

Replying, Blain McGuigan said: “If we were to go to the {British Boxing} Board of Control, I’m sure we could get the relevant documents."

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The barrister then asked Mr McGuigan to account for 137 tickets, at a face value of £20,479 (for the Cazares fight), the sales of which were allegedly unrecorded in the defendants’ financial records.

Mr McGuigan: “I’m sure that the expert accountants will be able to explain exactly where that was recorded.”

Mr Millar: “I’m asking you, as the promoter in real time, you’re promoting this fight, you’ve got 137 promoted ticket sales at that value, it’s a lot of money isn’t it, £20,000? So is this an example of you not having records in that period?”

Mr McGuigan: “There would have been some form of record afterwards. There would’ve been something. I can’t recall exactly where that was recorded. As I said before, I’m sure the expert accountants will be able to explain that.”

The barrister then referred Blain McGuigan to another document about sales and other expenses for the Cazares fight, saying: “Value Cabs £4,600, Hilton Belfast £4,600, Butcher and Grill £2,100. These should have been evidenced by documents. There should have been invoices or other documents showing that these were expenses incurred in relation to this fight”.

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Former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan arrives at Belfast High. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan arrives at Belfast High. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion and boxing promoter, Barry McGuigan arrives at Belfast High. Pic Stephen Davison

Mr McGuigan replied that there would have been statements and clear payments around those, with the exception of the Butcher and Grill.

“The Hilton was obviously where the officials stayed,” he said.

“As for Value Cabs...there was a lot of travel around that event, a lot of the supervisors from both sanctioning bodies would have flown into Dublin and we would’ve had to have done a lot of ferrying up and down.”

When asked by Mr Millar if there were invoices or vouchers for these expenses, Mr McGuigan replied; “No, I don’t believe so”.

With regard to the Martinez fight, the second time the Spaniard had fought Mr Frampton in Belfast, Mr McGuigan was asked to show “a single document in relation to the Martinez 2 fight that identifies you as the promoter?”

Mr McGuigan replied: “Again, there would be a lot of documents with the Board of Control. I did a lot of work around that event as the promoter obviously and there would be a lot of correspondence and documentation that highlights my work as a promoter.”

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Former world champion boxer Carl Frampton arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion boxer Carl Frampton arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

Former world champion boxer Carl Frampton arrives at Belfast High court. Pic Stephen Davison

On day 16, Blain McGuigan rejected suggestions the missing emails would have helped Mr Frampton's legal case against the McGuigans.

Instead, he said the emails were deleted to "free up space" ahead of a planned switch in accounts in 2017.

Blain McGuigan, 37, the eldest of three McGuigan sons, worked on eight of Mr Frampton's fights between 2013 and 2017.

The Frampton-McGuigan partnership broke down in August 2017.


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