Belfast Telegraph

Boarding schools in Republic seeing 'Brexit bounce' in enrolment

Boarding schools in the Republic are seeing an increase in enrolment off the back of what is being described as a 'Brexit bounce' (stock picture)
Boarding schools in the Republic are seeing an increase in enrolment off the back of what is being described as a 'Brexit bounce' (stock picture)

Boarding schools in the Republic are seeing an increase in enrolment off the back of what is being described as a 'Brexit bounce'.

The spike comes as a result of families opting for schools in the Republic over those in the United Kingdom.

The Irish Times reports fee-paying schools have seen a boost from Spanish and German families who have shifted their focus across the Irish Sea in anticipation of Britain leaving the European Union at the end of next March - with Irish schools representing an opportunity for children to be educated in English.

A survey carried out by the newspaper also found enrolment in private schools in the Republic was on the rise on account of Irish parents' increasing incomes.

It was also found fee-paying schools across the Republic had increased their fees in line with the rising demand.

Salaries at private schools in Ireland are generally lower than those in the mainland UK, due to schools in the Republic paying teachers out of a public salary pot of around €90m.

Brexit is expected to have a broader impact on the costs in the education sector in the United Kingdom and across Europe.

A new government analysis published earlier this month revealed that Northern Ireland students studying in the Republic could expect to face higher fees after Brexit.

The joint effort between the governments of Northern Ireland and the Republic found the number of students from Northern Ireland studying at higher education institutions south of the border fell by almost 40% between 2011/2012 and 2015/2016.

It is reported that non-EU students studying after Brexit could pay non-EU fees, which range from €9,750 up to €54,153 - substantially higher than the €3,000 a year fees are capped at for students from the EU.

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