| 13.5°C Belfast

'Border' collies dumped on St Patrick's Day in need of loving home

Pups found dumped near frontier on St Patrick's Day

Close

Rainbow Rehoming Centre director Anna Hyndman said the cross collie pups, aged between three and four months, are now hoping to find their forever homes

Rainbow Rehoming Centre director Anna Hyndman said the cross collie pups, aged between three and four months, are now hoping to find their forever homes

Rainbow Rehoming Centre director Anna Hyndman said the cross collie pups, aged between three and four months, are now hoping to find their forever homes

Four adorable puppies have had a lucky escape after being abandoned on a back road on the border with Co Donegal on St Patrick's Day.

The young dogs - who have now been named Tae, Maddie, Paddy and Timmy - were rescued from the edge of a remote field near Muff by a passer-by and taken to a nearby shelter.

Rainbow Rehoming Centre director Anna Hyndman said the cross collie pups, aged between three and four months, are now hoping to find their forever homes.

She said Tae has already been booked by a foster family, leaving her sister and brothers still searching for suitable homes in an appropriate dog-friendly environment.

"What type of a person dumps four little puppies near a field on St Patrick's Day?" asked Ms Hyndman.

"Understandably, these little pups were fairly nervous to begin with, but they have since started to gain confidence around their daily carers.

"They are collie crossbreeds so will possibly grow to be medium or large in size, and I would ask people to research the breed properly before enquiring.

"Puppies are cute, but they need commitment and basic training and these particular dogs need an active family, because they have a lot of energy. Nor are they suitable for people who work long hours, or homes with very young children.

"If you're interested in offering any of these wee faces a new home, please visit the centre during opening hours, which are 12-4pm from Tuesday to Sunday."

Ms Hyndman said there is a "serious issue" when it comes to abandoned collie dogs here, because people take them in without realising what looking after them requires.

"This type of dog is very high-spirited; they're not bred to lie around the yard," she said.

"Last year we rehomed 29 collies, which is not much different from any other year, and so far this year we've already rehomed eight and taken two out of the council pound.

"People think they're pretty when they're young and they don't realise how active they actually are, so it comes as a shock when they're far from the perfect companion for a couch potato."

Being a relatively small set-up, with the capacity for only a small number of dogs (12 for rehoming and five in quarantine) and around 30 cats, Rainbow Rehoming Centre requires a new home itself.

"We need a bigger site and we're accepting donations to try and relocate so that we can continue doing our work. Normally we rehome 450 cats and 250 dogs very year, with just six part-time employees and a volunteer network of between 35 and 40 people," she explained.

The main problem, according to Anna, is that people take in pets for the wrong reasons.

"We live in a society in which people believe they can get everything they want, so they don't do any research. It's not like buying a pair of shoes that you can decide to take back to the shop when you've changed your mind after a couple of days," she pointed out.

Belfast Telegraph