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Covid-19: Almost a year since the first case was detected in Northern Ireland, what have we learned?


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Reflection: a nurse during a demonstration of Covid-19 virus testing procedures in Antrim Area Hospital

Reflection: a nurse during a demonstration of Covid-19 virus testing procedures in Antrim Area Hospital

Warning: Robin Swann spoke of a tragedy of ‘biblical proportions’

Warning: Robin Swann spoke of a tragedy of ‘biblical proportions’

PA

Roll-out: John Grey receives the first of two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, administered by Dr Michael McKenna, at Falls Surgery Belfast

Roll-out: John Grey receives the first of two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, administered by Dr Michael McKenna, at Falls Surgery Belfast

PA

Helen Dolk, Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services Research at Ulster University

Helen Dolk, Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services Research at Ulster University

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Reflection: a nurse during a demonstration of Covid-19 virus testing procedures in Antrim Area Hospital

It is now almost one year since Covid-19 barrelled its way into Northern Ireland. The first case of the virus was diagnosed on February 27 last year and the first coronavirus-related death was confirmed less than three weeks later, on March 19.

Even as the virus claimed its first victim and with Health Minister Robin Swann warning of a tragedy of "biblical proportions", it was difficult to imagine what lay ahead.

How could anyone predict that schools would shut down for months at a time, that it would be illegal to visit family and friends, that patients dying in hospital would be denied the reassuring presence of a loved one in their final moments, or that we would become virtual prisoners in our own homes?


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