| 21.9°C Belfast

Drugs accused fails to get bail changed so he can stay out later

Close

An application to extend the curfew of a Co Down man currently on bail for drugs offences has been refused due to concerns he may "re-engage" in criminality

An application to extend the curfew of a Co Down man currently on bail for drugs offences has been refused due to concerns he may "re-engage" in criminality

An application to extend the curfew of a Co Down man currently on bail for drugs offences has been refused due to concerns he may "re-engage" in criminality

An application to extend the curfew of a Co Down man currently on bail for drugs offences has been refused due to concerns he may "re-engage" in criminality.

Stephen Samuel Thompson is facing charges linked to an incident in east Belfast last February, when a car crashed into a garden at Ravenswood Park.

The driver fled the scene and when the vehicle was searched, 1.5 kilograms of amphetamine was located, plus 240 grams of cannabis and an air pistol.

The Crown say Thompson was linked to the car forensically and he was arrested and charged with a string of offences including possessing Class A drugs with intent to supply and possessing a firearm without a certificate.

The 42-year-old, from Main Street in Greyabbey, spent time on remand before he was released on bail with conditions imposed.

One of the conditions was a 7pm to 7am curfew, and an application was made at Belfast Crown Court yesterday to extend the curfew to 9pm.

The application was opposed by the Crown, who said that an extra two hours in the evening gave Thompson the opportunity to "re-engage in drugs supply and other criminality."

This claim was rejected by defence barrister Richard McConkey, who said suggestions Thompson "is going to be supplying drugs because he has an extra two hours in the evening is slightly far-fetched".

Crown barrister David McNeill told Judge Patricia Smyth that police were objecting to the curfew variation due to concerns over drugs supply.

Mr McNeill also revealed that on June 21, Thompson breached his curfew "and his whereabouts could not be confirmed".

Citing police concerns that an extra two hours in the evening may give Thompson the opportunity to commit further drugs offences, Mr McNeill said it was on this basis that the curfew variation was opposed.

Branding this as "far-fetched", defence barrister Richard McConkey said his client "wants to be able to go out until 9pm".

He added: "There are three young children in the house and if he takes his children for a walk in the evening, he cannot do that after 7pm."

Branding the 7pm to 7am curfew as "necessary and proportionate", Judge Smyth refused the application to vary it.

Belfast Telegraph