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Leak of 'top secret' Stevens Report to loyalist terrorists sparked anger

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Report: Sir John Stevens found that some members of the UDR were colluding with loyalist terrorists

Report: Sir John Stevens found that some members of the UDR were colluding with loyalist terrorists

Report: Sir John Stevens found that some members of the UDR were colluding with loyalist terrorists

The Irish Government sought an explanation from the British authorities as to how an advance copy of the Stevens Report into collusion could have been leaked to a loyalist terrorist organisation.

Confidential files released as part of the 1990 State Archive in the Republic revealed significant concern in Dublin at how the leak - reported by one Irish newspaper - could have occurred.

The report conducted by Sir John Stevens, the Chief Constable of Cambridgeshire, found that loyalist terrorists had received detailed information generated by the security services.

It found conclusively that certain members of the UDR were engaged in collusion with loyalist terrorists.

However, one Irish newspaper revealed that Ulster Resistance already had a copy of the top secret report.

A Department of Foreign Affairs memo confirmed the Irish Government had sought clarification from London on the leak issue.

"We have asked the other side for their comments on the newspaper report.

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"We have also reminded them of the Chief Constable's assurance at the last conference that each copy of the Stevens Report was marked so that if there was any question of a copy getting out it will be possible to trace it back to the marked copy," the Department of Foreign Affairs memorandum stated.

Foreign Affairs Minister Gerry Collins noted that the Stevens Report had "confirmed the basis for the Government's profound concern" over collusion.

The report was published after the offices used by the Stevens team in Northern Ireland were damaged in a mysterious arson attack.

It was later alleged that the blaze was the work of a secret military intelligence unit based in Belfast.

In a separate and unrelated file, the Irish Government was told on June 15, 1988, of the constant harassment of the nationalist community.

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Border: Aidan McAnespie was shot in the back at an Army checkpoint

Border: Aidan McAnespie was shot in the back at an Army checkpoint

Border: Aidan McAnespie was shot in the back at an Army checkpoint

Aidan McAnespie (23) died after being shot in the back by a soldier after he passed through a border checkpoint in Tyrone on February 21, 1988.

Irish officials, including the Justice Minister and Tanaiste, met with John McAnespie, Aidan's father, and Eilish McCabe, the young man's sister.

"Mrs McCabe also said that a phone call had been received in the McAnespie home in recent weeks from a man with an English accent who asked to speak to Aidan McAnespie (the deceased). He said: 'The boys are back in town'."


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