Belfast Telegraph

Loughinisland massacre film No Stone Unturned nominated for Emmy

No Stone Unturned broke new ground by naming suspects it said were involved in the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) killings of six Catholic men gathered in a village pub watching the Republic of Ireland play (Jigsaw Productions/PA).
No Stone Unturned broke new ground by naming suspects it said were involved in the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) killings of six Catholic men gathered in a village pub watching the Republic of Ireland play (Jigsaw Productions/PA).

A documentary about the Loughinisland massacre has been nominated for an Emmy.

The 2017 documentary No Stone Unturned, which caused controversy after naming suspects said to be involved in the UVF killings, has been nominated in the outstanding investigative documentary category.

The film looked into the atrocity which took place on June 18 1994 in the small village of Loughinsland when members of the UVF burst into the pub and opened fire on customers watching the Republic of Ireland playing Italy in the World Cup. Six people were killed and five were wounded.

Belfast-based journalists Trevor Birney and Barry McCaffrey, who worked on the film, were the subject of a criminal investigation over the alleged theft of a Police Ombudsman document that appeared in the documentary.

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Loughinisland documentary film makers Trevor Birney (left) and Barry McCaffrey

The investigation was dropped after the reporters won a High Court action challenging police actions in enforcing a warrant to seize material from them.

The journalists strongly denied the Ombudsman document was stolen saying they came from a whistleblower.

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The aftermath of the Loughinisland shooting

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