| 11.9°C Belfast

Major clear-up as Met Office warns snow on way

350 customers left without power last night after third battering in a week by gales

Close

Foam on the promenade in Portstewart. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Foam on the promenade in Portstewart. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Getty Images

Big waves in Portrush. Credit: Owen Hunt

Big waves in Portrush. Credit: Owen Hunt

Toppled beech trees at Myroe, outside Limavady. Credit: Trevor McBride

Toppled beech trees at Myroe, outside Limavady. Credit: Trevor McBride

Damage: A trampoline is upended in Ballyclare

Damage: A trampoline is upended in Ballyclare

Wearing a wetsuit, Stevie McCarry, owner of Native Seafood carries pots and pans from his flooded premises. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Wearing a wetsuit, Stevie McCarry, owner of Native Seafood carries pots and pans from his flooded premises. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Getty Images

/

Foam on the promenade in Portstewart. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Northern Ireland could be hit by snow showers and further unsettled weather later this week after Storm Franklin swept through, leaving a trail of destruction.

While things are to calm down on Tuesday the Met Office has forecast blustery and wintry showers for Wednesday and Thursday.

It said: “Storm Franklin has moved away to the east now, although further unsettled weather is forecast this week, and although not generally expected to be as impactful, some disruption is still possible later.”

It added that colder weather will take hold towards the end of the week.

“From Wednesday evening through to Friday morning, a mix of clear or sunny spells and scattered showers are expected, the showers falling as hail, sleet or snow at times with the possibility of the snow settling, especially overnight on high ground,” it said.

“In places, a slight covering of snow is also possible at lower levels.

“Icy patches and frost are also likely overnight.

Daily Headlines & Evening Telegraph Newsletter

Receive today's headlines directly to your inbox every morning and evening, with our free daily newsletter.

This field is required

“It’s a little too early to confirm, but the snow could give some disruption to travel in places.”

It comes after the third named storm in less than a week made landfall, wreaking havoc on Sunday night and into Monday morning.

At the height of the storm NIE Networks reported that 10,000 customers suffered power cuts.

Electricity has now been restored to the vast majority of those affected homes and businesses.

However, 350 customers were still to be restored to the grid on Monday evening. NIE said it was hoping to get them all back on line by midnight.

The PSNI said there had been “widespread disruption” on the roads as a result of the storm.

Police in Mid Ulster posted on Facebook that trees were “falling like dominoes”, adding that “as quick as one is cleared, another comes down”.

It was the first time since 2014, when the Met Office and Met Éireann started working together on the Storm names partnership, that three had hit in a single week.

There was also heavy rainfall ahead of Storm Franklin on Sunday, which caused severe flooding in some parts.

The Department for Infrastructure said it had dealt with more than 300 incidents of flooding and obstructions on roads, with 175 of them in the north and west of the province.

Meanwhile, a school in Coleraine was forced to close after high winds caused the roof of a classroom to blow off.

North Coast Integrated College principal Angela Passmore told the BBC: “We made the call today to close the school. We are trying to make this structure safe so that we can get pupils back into school, hopefully tomorrow.”

She estimated that it could cost about £10,000 to repair the damage.

Translink was also forced to close the line at Whiteabbey for a time after a tree fell across the rail track.

The top wind gusts were recorded at Orlock Head in Co Down — which experienced speeds of 78mph.

A yellow wind warning ended earlier on Monday.

In the Republic, more than 30,000 homes and businesses were without power at one point on Monday.

Nearly 9,000 homes and businesses were still without electricity on Monday night.

Met Éireann said gusts of more than 80mph were recorded in counties Galway and Donegal.

Council staff in Sligo and elsewhere were still working on Monday evening to clear debris and reopen roads.

In Britain the storm sparked evacuations in some areas as well as rush hour travel chaos. Business and Energy Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng told the Commons: “Four people have tragically lost their lives in incidents related to storms.”

Storm Franklin’s strongest gust of 87mph was recorded at the Needles on the Isle of Wight on Sunday evening, followed by gusts of 79mph on a mountaintop in Wales.


Top Videos



Privacy